Recent acquisitions at the Metropolitan Museum


2/5/11 – Acquisitions – New York, The Metropolitan Museum of Art – Besides the acquisition of a painting and a drawing by Perino del Vaga which we already pointed out (see news item of 10/3/11), several other works have joined the Metropolitan Museum since the beginning of the year. At the same auction at Sotheby’s New York on 27 January, a painting by Corrado Giaquinto representing Medea Rejuvenating Aeson (ill. 1), estimated at between $ 100.000 and $150.000, had not sold but was then purchased directly by the museum.
As seen on the back of the canvas, the inscription Arazzi (meaning Tapestries in Italian), by the artist himself, would seem to show that this is probably a study for a tapestry cartoon which was apparently never woven. Giaquinto, who was in Spain from 1753 until 1762, was in fact the head of the Royal tapestry factory, la Real Fábrica de Tapices y Alfombras de Santa Bárbara.


1. Corrado Giaquinto (1703-1765)
Medea Rejuvenating Aeson
Oil on canvas - 73.5 x 54.5 cm
New York, The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Photo : The Metropolitan Museum of Art

2. Pieter de Witte, calledPietro Candido (c. 1548-1628)
The Annunciation
Oil on panel - 231.8 x 173.3 cm
New York, The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Photo : The Metropolitan Museum of Art


At the Christie’s New York auction of last 26 January, Fabrizio Moretti purchased an Annunciation (ill. 2) attributed to Pieter de Witte, also known by his Italian name, Pietro Candido, which he immediately donated to the Metropolitan Museum in honor of Keith Christiansen. The painting is now clearly acknowledged as being by this artist, born in Bruges but who arrived in Florence in 1558 at the age of ten. He pursued most of his career in Italy until 1586, when he left for Munich where he worked and lived for many years until his death in 1628. An Annunciation by Pietro Candido resides in the St Michaelskirche in this city. However, contrary to the description given in the Christie’s catalogue, the two compositions are very different.


3. Charles Coypel (1694-1752)
Double Portrait Presumed of Jean de Jullienne
and his Wife
, 1743
Pastel, watercolour - 100 x 80 cm
New York, The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Photo : The Metropolitan Museum of Art



Another purchase made in 2011, through the Aaron Gallery, was a pastel by Charles Coypel (ill. 3), the portrait of Jean de Jullienne and his wife, identified by an old inscription on the back. This is not the famous collector, but rather his son.


4. Théodore Géricault (1791-1824)
Lions
Oil on canvas - 48.3 x 59.7 cm
New York, The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Photo : The Metropolitan Museum of Art

5. After Théodore Géricault (1791-1824)
Lions
Oil on cnavas - 46 x 56 cm
Paris, Musée du Louvre
Photo : RMN


The last acquisition for 2011 which we would like to mention in this article is a panel by Théodore Géricault (ill. 4), from the Schickler collection, acquired through the Sayn-Wittgenstein Fine Art Gallery in New York, almost identical to an oil on canvas held at the Musée du Louvre (ill. 5).

Finally, let us name several paintings acquired in 2010 which we had not yet discussed :


6. Circle de Hugo van der Goes (c. 1420-1482)
Portrait of a Man, c. 1470-1475
Oil on paper, laid down on wood - 22.2 x 16.5 cm
New York, The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Photo : The Metropolitan Museum of Art



Circle of Hugo van der Goes, Portrait of a Man (ill. 6). This is an oil on paper acquired by the museum from Richard L. Feigen in New York, and with a date of around 1470-1475. The Metropolitan Museum owns two other paintings by van der Goes, the Portrait of a Benedictine Monk and a Portrait of a Man.


7. Orazio Borgianni (1578-1616)
Head of an Old Woman , after 1610
Oil on canvas - 53 x 39 cm
New York, The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Photo : The Metropolitan Museum of Art

8. Orazio Borgianni (1578-1616)
Holy Family, c. 1600
Oil on canvas - 226 x 173 cm
Roma, Galleria Nazionale d’Arte Antica, Palazzo Barberini
Photo : Wikipedia


Orazio Borgianni, Head of an Old Woman (ill. 7). This work was purchased from the Robilant+Voena Gallery in London. According to the museum entry, the model (who might be the painter’s mother since we know he did a portrait of her) had been used a few years earlier for Saint Elizabeth in a Holy Family painted by Borgianni (ill. 8).


9. Philipp Jacob Scheffauer (1756-1808)
Artemisia in Mourning , 1794
Marble - 50.2 x 30 x 5 cm
New York, The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Photo : The Metropolitan Museum of Art



Philipp Jacob Scheffauer, Artemisia Weeping for her Husband (ill. 9). This marble relief, auctioned at Lempertz’s in Cologne, was acquired by the Charles Janoray Museum. Scheffauer, close to Johann Heinrich Dannecker in Stuttgart, also studied under Augustin Pajou in Paris. This perfectly Neo-Classic work reflects the influence of the latter but also that of sculptors such as Antonio Canova and Johan Tobias Sergel.


10. Michele Gordigiani (1835-1909)
Portrait of a Woman, 1864
Oil on canvas - 64 x 52 cm
New York, The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Photo : The Metropolitan Museum of Art



Michele Gordigiani, Portrait of a Woman (ill. 10). This canvas, painted in 1864 by an Italian artist who is not very well known, recalls the art of Frans Xaver Winterhalter. It was purchased from the Florentine art dealer, Gianfranco Grimaldi who had bought it at auction at Pandolfini Casa d’Aste on 27 October 2008.


11. Pierre-Auguste Renoir (1841-1919)
Still Life with Flowers and Prickly Pears , c. 1884
Oil on canvas - 188 x 152.4 cm
New York, The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Photo : The Metropolitan Museum of Art



Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Still Life with Flowers and Prickly Pears (ill. 11). This painting was bequeathed by Catherine V. Gaisman.


Didier Rykner, lundi 2 mai 2011



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